Options in Life trips - 13th July

Trips for the Options in Life charity and for the local community

Options in Life members getting "steering time" on Badger.
Options in Life members getting “steering time” on Badger.

This trip took one of Taymara’s regular groups from Options in Life, a organisation which provides care and help to young autistic adults and children.

 

20150713-DSCF4161The water was nice and calm, considerably better than earlier in the week, which provided a peaceful trip for all on board. Unfortunately there were no dolphins, despite the perfect conditions presented. As well as the occasional seal and gannet, there was the opportunity to drive alongside another vessel “Teal” obeying the “Rules of the Road” and demonstrating how to handle a boat with other traffic nearby.  This led into all those on board having a chance at the helm, and learning more about how Badger handles on the water.

 

"Teal", a powerful catamaran currently working in the Tay
“Teal”, a powerful catamaran currently working in the Tay

 

 

Giving an Options in Life member instruction on the wheel
Giving an Options in Life member instruction on the wheel

Later on, there was a scheduled trip for menbers of the local community, which specifically sailed on a trip from the Horseshoe Buoy and along
the Tayport/Newport shore – allowing some awesome close-up views of the Rail and Road bridges and shore-side houses.
(As well as giving Bob a chance to get some photos of his home!).

 

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Badger is well suited to introducing people to boats as well as being great fun to sail in
Badger is well suited to introducing people to boats as well as being great fun to sail in

Everyone enjoyed their time finding out about the Tay and handling Badger as well as numerous other learning opportunities to add to what they’ve already learned during previous trips with Taymara

(With thanks to Connor Nicoll)

 


Badger Trips - Sunday 12th

Passenger and training trips on Badger - Sunday 12th July

Badger coming alongside at Broughty Ferry
Badger coming alongside at Broughty Ferry

Badger arrives at Broughty Ferry to carry out passenger carrying trips for the public.

 

 

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Initially the weather was looking rough and very choppy- the trip from Tayport to Broughty Ferry was a rather interesting and bumpy ride - enough to bring into question if these trips would go ahead. Thankfully the weather took our side and calmed sufficiently to warrant a safe voyage for both passengers and crew.

 

 

Sailing out to the Horseshoe Buoy
Sailing out to the Horseshoe Buoy

The first trip, although a tad choppy in open waters, only brought about a small pod of dolphins- the "Advance Party" as they were referred to. With the occasional Gannet feeding and the odd seagull - it was a poor showing from the local wildlife, however that being said, all passengers enjoyed the trip.

 

 

Disembarking passengers at Broughty Ferry Harbour
Disembarking passengers at Broughty Ferry Harbour

 

 

 

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Looking for dolphins in Badger's wheelhouse

 

The Second trip, proved to be very active, for both wildlife and traffic - sailing yachts took advantage of the winds and waves to help hone a highly complex skill - utilising the energy of the wind to propel themselves at astonishing speeds.
In addition to this, the crew's assumption of an 'advance party' were correct, as more dolphins came to show - although needless to say, they were more interested in feeding than coming to check out and inspect Badger as she passed through the everchanging sea.

 

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Bottlenose dolphin
Bottlenose dolphin

 

 

 

Adjusting the ropes
Adjusting the ropes

 

 

 

Coming in to berth at Broughty Harbour
Coming in to berth at Broughty Harbour

 

On the third and final trip, the dolphins had disappeared so as a result, we didn't get to see much wildlife. The seas looked to get a bit choppier again, resulting in the passengers and crew mistaking waves and "white-wash" as dolphins and other wildlife. It was both interesting, and confusing at the same time - gauging and guessing where the dolphins would be and how many there were.

 

Badger at the Fife side of the Tay
Badger over at the Fife shore.

 

 

 

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Passengers in Badger's rear cockpit

 

 

 

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After the last passengers disembark - training for one of our service users

Thanks - to Connor Nicoll

 


Work on Vessels - Missel Thrush

Maintenance on all our vessels is carried out by our members

Work ranges from maintaining the vessels interior/exterior to major engineering operations
Work carried out by Taymara members ranges from maintaining the vessels interior/exterior to major engineering operations

With Missel Thrush safely berthed in Tayport Harbour, work now begins on preparing her for her first survey with us and getting her "into code" so that she can carry passengers - (12 passengers and 3 crew).

 

At her moorings with Badger alongside
At her moorings in Tayport with Badger alongside

Working on the outside of the boats is a lot more pleasant in the summer! Paint dries, so does varnish and you don't need to wear 15 layers of thermals to stop shivering.

 

 

Varnishing the handrails
Varnishing the handrails

The handrails needed to be sanded back and re-varnished with marine quality varnish. Pete starts on the starboard rail.

 

 

Good preparation, as ever, is the key
Good preparation, as ever, is the key. The sanding down was carried out, under supervision,  by some of our youinger trainees

One of Taymara's lesser known attributes is the way in which we introduce our members and trainees to traditional hands-on maintenance work. Practical skills are shared and passed on to our new recruits and others who wish to learn.  At a time when so many "normal" practical skills have almost disappeared within the span of one generation - passing on these skills is a valuable part of our training and one which we all enjoy sharing.

 

Jimmy preparing the woodwork in the forward cabin
Jimmy cleaning off the woodwork in the forward cabin

The range of hands-on skills needed to maintain a vessel in seaworthy condition is extensive and varied. Anyone taking part in our vessel's upkeep soon finds a niche whatever their existing abilities and we like to work with that to further develop each individual's skills.

 

 

John using the scraper to remove old adhesive in the saloon
John using a scraper to remove old adhesive in the saloon

Jimmy and John are working below to clean up the paintwork with a view to preserving the existing finish which is in basically good condition.

 

 

As seen from the wheelhouse!
As seen from the wheelhouse!

Meanwhile, back on deck...

 

 

Whatever it was you said.... I certainly did not do it.
I'm not sure what you said.... but I most certainly did not do it.

The painting and varnishing continues

 

 

We don't know what Dave was doing...
Dave finds something

 

Dave's in the lazarette - "A lazarette is usually a storage locker used for gear or equipment a sailor would use around the decks on a sailing vessel.
It is typically found below the weather deck in the stern of the vessel and is accessed through a hatch if accessed from the main deck.
The equipment usually stored in a lazarette would be spare lines, sails, sail repair, line and cable splicing repair equipment, fenders, bosun chair, spare blocks, tools etc."

 

Seen at low tide - the entrance to Tayport harbour
Seen at low tide - the entrance to Tayport harbour

For future reference to all skippers.... The way in to Tayport Harbour (Low Tide).

 


Missel Thrush, Tayport

Many thanks to Graham Meyer and Lynn Atkin for passing on this splendid vessel to us

Missel Thrush just prior to entering Tayport Harbour
Missel Thrush, having sailed up from Northern France, just prior to entering Tayport Harbour

One fine Thursday evening, this beautiful motor yacht sailed from France to join Badger in Tayport Harbour. Here she is just off Tayport.

 

 

Catalina preparing to leave Tayport Harbour
Catalina preparing to leave Tayport Harbour

Naturally, we all wanted the best viewpoint to see her sail in, so Badger and Catalina set off from Tayport to meet her.

 

 

Missel Thrush in the distance approaching the Larick Beacon
Missel Thrush in the distance approaching the Larick Beacon

If we'd left it any later she'd have been upon us in the harbour.   "What's that big white boat by the Larick.......?"

 

 

Past the Larick now and waiting for the tide, Tentsmuir Forest in the background
Past the Larick now and waiting for the tide, Tentsmuir Forest in the background

 

 

 

Catalina approaches
Catalina approaches

We all meet up for a big hello.

 

 

Escort Duty
Escort Duty

You're meant to be escorting not waving.....oh never mind

 

 

Time to enter the harbour now
Time to enter the harbour now

 

 

 

Catalina getting up on the plane
Catalina getting up on the plane

Catalina goes in to take ropes for Missel Thrush and Badger.

 

 

Missel Thrush in Tayport
Missel Thrush in Tayport

Entering Tayport Harbour, preparing the ropes for throwing.

 

 

The Tayport Heron
The Tayport Heron

The resident heron flew past.

 

 

Approaching her berth
Missel Thrush approaching her berth

Going in to tie up just ahead of Badger. The end of a long journey for the crew.

 

 

Looking aft
Looking aft

Ready for another trip

 


Research work on the Tay

Taymara and the crew of Badger are glad to assist research student Chika Edeh from St Andrews University with his ongoing work focused on the River Tay

Earth and Environmental Sciences department of St Andrews University
Preparing equipment in Badgers wheelhouse

 

 

navigating around Newburgh. River Tay
Numerous sandbanks and narrow channels make navigating around Newburgh a precise exercise

 

In Chika's own words -
"My name is Chikodili Edeh-(Chika) and I am a second year PhD candidate with the Earth and Environmental Sciences department of St Andrews University. My research study is on the Tay Estuary. "

 

Sorting out ropes and tackle
Sorting out ropes and tackle - Chika and Tony

 

"Estuaries usually serve as transfer pathways for dissolved particulate materials moving from continent to the marine system through rivers . Several physical, and geochemical dynamics are involved in the process of estuarine carbon dioxide movements within the system. This study aims to address knowledge gaps identified with regards to the mechanisms of carbon dioxide escape from within the Tay estuary. To study these I would be carrying out some measurements and tests on the estuary and surrounding marshes as follows: a) direct measurements for carbon dioxide escape using a floating device and also by installation and monitoring of an Eddie covariance tower; b) water sampling and analysis for relevant geochemical information; and c) use of an acoustic doubler current profiler (ADCP) to assess any correlation or influence of water currents on the rate and volume of carbon dioxide escape from the system. "

 

Ready to go overboard.The equipment....not Chika
Ready to go overboard.

 

"My supervisors- Dr Ruth Robinson, and Dr Tim Hill, and myself are very grateful for the involvement of the Tay Marine Action Group. Taymara, through Bob Richmond and the crew at the Badger are providing a most essential support with the Badger which enables me to be out on the Tay at least once a month over the period of this study. I expect to conclude within 24 months."

 

Overboard.
Overboard.

 

 

Chika Edeh, Earth and Environmental Sciences department, St Andrews University
Chika Edeh

 

 

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Badger's crew this day
Badger's crew this day

Taymara Times

Many thanks to David Kett for this issue of Taymara Times
(Click Link)

Taymara Times

 


North Carr Lightship Video Tour

A video tour of North Carr by the Dundee Courier

A video tour of North Carr Lightship

To view, Click on this link to the Dundee Courier’s Video Tour of North Carr

This video gives a fascinating, in-depth view of the North Carr Lightship from the depths of the chain locker deep in the ship’s bow, through the engine room, crews quarters, Masters cabin, foghorn, radio room, galley and up to the top of the light tower itself. Filmed by the Richard Rooney, Online Editor of the Courier and narrated by Taymara’s own “Attenborough”....Bob Richmond

 

 


Baby Dolphin

A baby bottlenosed dolphin seen from Badger

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We're not sure if this baby has a deformed dorsal fin or if it is a new born calf, no more than a few hours old. When the calves are born, their dorsal fins are soft and floppy for the first few hours into their life to assist the birth.

See also - Dolphin Gallery, photos taken by Taymara from Badger and Marigot

 

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This calf seems a bit large in relation to its mother and it also seems quite dark in colour to be a new born but observations lasting no more than a second or two can't be relied upon to give any true indications.
It may be a very recent birth.

 

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One breath

One breath from a bottlenosed dolphin as seen from Badger

Just below the surface and beginning to exhale
Just below the surface and beginning to exhale

See also - Dolphin Gallery, photos taken by Taymara from Badger and Marigot

 

Beginning to break the surface and still exhaling
Beginning to break the surface and still exhaling

 

 

Just breaking the surface and this is when you begin to hear the explosive "Haaa" sound they make
Just breaking the surface and this is when you hear the explosive sound of the dolphin's breath. Note the faint plume.

 

 

Continuing the roll and inhaling
Continuing the roll and inhaling now

 

 

Done. Back underwater now
Breath complete and returning underwater