Maintenance on all our vessels is carried out by our members

Work ranges from maintaining the vessels interior/exterior to major engineering operations
Work carried out by Taymara members ranges from maintaining the vessels interior/exterior to major engineering operations

With Missel Thrush safely berthed in Tayport Harbour, work now begins on preparing her for her first survey with us and getting her “into code” so that she can carry passengers – (12 passengers and 3 crew).

 

At her moorings with Badger alongside
At her moorings in Tayport with Badger alongside

Working on the outside of the boats is a lot more pleasant in the summer! Paint dries, so does varnish and you don’t need to wear 15 layers of thermals to stop shivering.

 

 

Varnishing the handrails
Varnishing the handrails

The handrails needed to be sanded back and re-varnished with marine quality varnish. Pete starts on the starboard rail.

 

 

Good preparation, as ever, is the key
Good preparation, as ever, is the key. The sanding down was carried out, under supervision,  by some of our youinger trainees

One of Taymara’s lesser known attributes is the way in which we introduce our members and trainees to traditional hands-on maintenance work. Practical skills are shared and passed on to our new recruits and others who wish to learn.  At a time when so many “normal” practical skills have almost disappeared within the span of one generation – passing on these skills is a valuable part of our training and one which we all enjoy sharing.

 

Jimmy preparing the woodwork in the forward cabin
Jimmy cleaning off the woodwork in the forward cabin

The range of hands-on skills needed to maintain a vessel in seaworthy condition is extensive and varied. Anyone taking part in our vessel’s upkeep soon finds a niche whatever their existing abilities and we like to work with that to further develop each individual’s skills.

 

 

John using the scraper to remove old adhesive in the saloon
John using a scraper to remove old adhesive in the saloon

Jimmy and John are working below to clean up the paintwork with a view to preserving the existing finish which is in basically good condition.

 

 

As seen from the wheelhouse!
As seen from the wheelhouse!

Meanwhile, back on deck…

 

 

Whatever it was you said.... I certainly did not do it.
I’m not sure what you said…. but I most certainly did not do it.

The painting and varnishing continues

 

 

We don't know what Dave was doing...
Dave finds something

 

Dave’s in the lazarette – “A lazarette is usually a storage locker used for gear or equipment a sailor would use around the decks on a sailing vessel.
It is typically found below the weather deck in the stern of the vessel and is accessed through a hatch if accessed from the main deck.
The equipment usually stored in a lazarette would be spare lines, sails, sail repair, line and cable splicing repair equipment, fenders, bosun chair, spare blocks, tools etc.”

 

Seen at low tide - the entrance to Tayport harbour
Seen at low tide – the entrance to Tayport harbour

For future reference to all skippers…. The way in to Tayport Harbour (Low Tide).